Category Archives: Kayak Days on the River

Pictures from Latest Kayak run on the River

Thought it’s time to post a few more pictures from a mid-summer kayak paddle on the River…  This was taken on the fifteenth – a week ago.  Enjoy!


Immature red shafted flicker, you can still see the scruffy baby feathers – yes, a bit shaky but hand holding in a kayak, pointing up in the sky’ll do that at high magnification…! 


Hope river reflections in the morning – and you can already see and sense those fall colors developing.  

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River otter – Hope river – actual caption: “What cha lookin’ at?” 


Red barn – this is an encore: I just love this scene. I have a special folder of just “red barn” images taken over the years passing by this “Kodak moment” farm…


Turkey vulture… either cooling off or just showing off.


Lesser yellowlegs (large sandpiper) feeding on the banks of the Hope river.  Notice the flattened shape of the leg bones – these birds can actually swim if they are forced to. 


Receding waters on a back channel of the Fraser river – every bit as wonderful to be in this as it looks, perhaps even better. 


Mid-summer Fraser: expanding gravel bars, receding waters.  As I never wear shoes (and usually nothing else either – blushing) while kayaking, here’s where you are truly thankful for tough soles and feet. 


Hi there, excuse me, uh, sorry a bit drunk.  I seem to have gotten myself tangled up here, can you help me?  No?  OK, well, have a nice day… 


Picturesque landscape-Fraser river channel with Mt. Cheam in background – typical Chilliwack view.


Typical gravel bar grasses


mini “sunflowers” (they’re not, actually, but I don’t know what they really are – relatives of the dandelion?) blowing in the wind


Camera follies – some sort of goofy setting that lets the camera have fun with landscapes


More camera follies. Next generation won’t even need a photographer. Just send the camera out by itself to get pictures… !


Some New Pictures from the Hope and Fraser Rivers – July 24th and 26th

Many years ago, a client who then owned a small second hand store here in Chilliwack gave me a used Powershot (Canon) camera for some work I’d done she was thankful for beyond what I charged.  The camera served me well for many years but finally broke down a couple of months ago.  I sadly had it recycled and decided it was time to upgrade to a new Powershot.  A model SX 720 HS – a pretty impressive little camera for the non-professional.  Now I get to take pretty decent pictures of wildlife and macro shots of plants, flowers and insects.

The following pictures are some results of my efforts in learning how to manipulate this little computer.  It’s got a 40X  optical zoom lens, plus very good digitally enhanced zoom up to 160X.  Enjoy.    (PS: if any of these pictures interest you and you want to use them for whatever purpose, please feel free to do so – all permission granted… 🙂 )


Blue Heron on the Hope River


Daytime moon


Blue Heron on an arm of the Fraser River about 100X zoom shot


Water plaintain(?) – Hope River

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Female Mallard enjoying the sun


Fraser River back waters starting their summer drop


Pearly everlastings – Fraser river banks


Thistles – Fraser River


Some colourful Fraser river gravel bar rocks and a piece of driftwood


Yeah! The gulls are returning again. Flight of California gulls returning to their winter feeding grounds on the River


The Fraser river in full regalia and summer glory!


Two smiling young mallards swimming along but ever watchful


Blue damselfly on a blade of grass – Hope river shallows


Skittish solitary or spotted sandpiper on the Hope river


Immature rufous hummingbird on a honeysuckle branch


Red dragonfly – I wanted to emphasize the beauty of her wings


A spider web in an Alberta spruce: this spider’s on crack!


A Western crow on a distant snag giving me the eye


The red barn – on the little Hope river


Beauties from the River and around the Neighbourhood, part Deux.




Some kind of plantain? Colourful!


Life doesn’t get any better than this; kayaking the River in summer – taking a tanning and reading break on a sand bar


A mallard nest on one of the many little islands


Young Pacific willow shoots on a sand bar


Mount Cheam from East Chilliwack – February


Peaceful channel off the River


English hawthorn (more common here than Pacific or western hawthorn) in full bloom


One of many swamps hidden from view of boaters; havens for ducks, kingfishers, flycatchers, small herons and warblers


Wind spinners using “local” materials: a rusted hunting knife, some driftwood, fishline and hooks all dug from the sands



Sun Reflection


Eroding sand bar


On the River in August

down the channel-clouds over Sumas mtn1

Down another “narrow” channel; returning home and storm rising. (poor definition: using old flip phone camera in this shot)

Early Morning Kayaking: Hope River


This  (low density) picture was taken on the little Hope River, a small tributary of the Fraser (which I usually refer to as “The River”) that flows just behind the house.  If I choose to use that channel to access The River, I only need to drag/carry the kayak across the back yard and across about five hundred feet of grassy park land.  Even with encroaching human “civilization” all around, there is an amazing and varied number of birds and wildlife populating its haunts. 

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It’s still a beautiful little river especially at high water in June.  This stream is however heavily polluted with chemicals from agro-business freely-dumped effluents from loafing barns, cattle pens and run-off of chemical fertilizers and pest control used on commercial crop fields upstream.  It is sadly only too representative of the general state of a planet in decay and decadence where nature can no longer cope with man’s gross incursions.  

Sorry about the negativity here, but unless all of us wake up to the reality of what we are deliberately doing to our natural environment we won’t be leaving much of any sort of quality future to the next generations.  For my part, knowing what I now know, having observed man’s ways and current trends, I would choose not to bring children onto this world – it would be too much like condemning them to a life of hopelessness; perhaps of unavoidable horror.   But as the old saying goes, “there are none so blind as those that will not see.”

I know it is currently very politically correct to speak of “climate change” as man’s own creation but I strongly suspect that “climate change” is not man’s most serious crime against a world’s ecology, in fact it is primarily a consequence of a cyclic natural occurrence – hence why “climate change” is becoming such a popular political topic, especially intergovernmentally.  

Two things I know for sure: government-sponsored “caring” about anything or anyone is a complete contradiction – and the majority is always wrong.   

We didn’t create “climate change” as the vast majority whose eyes and ears are glued to info-media is now brainwashed to believe.  Man-made climate change is a carefully constructed psy-op designed so that people will not look at the planet’s real man-made problems.   We did create a nightmare world which is about to get much, much worse, with or without climate change.  Man’s pollution-creating technology is entirely out of control and each new political administration of those nations “that matter” militarily and economically and who could make a difference, talk more and do less about the overall problems.  For these vested interest groups the trick of propaganda is to ensure that “business as usual” proceeds according to rules invented in the 19th Century.


A Sunny River Day in January

Ok, my second try at posting pictures.  Another River day in the kayak, this time on January 15, 2015.   Though it is sunny, it’s the middle of Winter here and the air is quite nippy!  There was ice bordering the shallower ponds with little current.  This, again, is a quieter little side channel to the main River – making it easier to keep up to the current and still handle the camera.  Looks can be deceiving with water: I flipped over here in the Autumn of 2014.  That was a cold experience!  By the way, that is not snow on those rocks.  It’s their natural coloration.  This area is known by rock hounds for its beautiful stones polished and washed down from the Fraser Canyon by the River.

You don’t see the kayak here, but it’s important to remember that kayaking involves long hours of repetitive, rhythmic motion, and you can make those motions into suitable repetitions of life-affirming mantras.  One of those I like to use while paddling goes like this, and each word is a stroke, left, then right, then left…  “Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, gentleness, self-control” then repeat.

This list of “virtues” found in the Christian New Testament is freely available to anyone looking for something truly good to help focus and change one’s life for the better.  The key is listening.  Sure, we can pray, repeat mantras, chant, say all kinds of things: we can talk and we can hear… but most of the time we’re not listening.  Remember the song by Simon and Garfunkel, “The Sound of Silence”?  “People talking without speaking, people hearing without listening, people writing songs that no one ever share…”

One of the great curses of the age is that it produces so much noise and so many words that turn into a cacophony of meaninglessness, or worse, give utterance to uncertainty and fear.  A day in the kayak on the River brings it all back into focus – though it is not the only way, just a way that I chose for myself.


A Day on the River – picture only


The kayak, a small channel of water, sand bars: my local paradise on the Fraser River

I’ve been thinking of dedicating a post once in a while to the thousands of pictures I have taken of my personal paradise on the Fraser River, near Chilliwack.  This picture, offered as taken without any enhancements, was taken in late August 2012.  The high waters of June are much receded here, exposing miles of sandy beaches (as depicted here), and in other places, low willow thickets, grass marshes and gravel bars.  More to come.