Consciousness, Hallucinations and the evolution of human perception

This is a great read, enjoy!

Too much Too soon

We can define a hallucination, roughly, as a perception that exists in the absence of external stimulus and feels real. The question I’d like answered is, how do we determine that there is, in fact, a lack of external stimulus?

We cannot reasonably assert that our ordinary waking consciousness is necessarily the broadest, most accurate lens through which one perceives the external world.

The human nervous system has evolved over the last few hundred million years to deal with a very specific and specialized set of circumstances, namely survival on the plains of Africa.

Our brains seem to be best adapted to solving the problems of spotting predator and prey, picking berries and seeds, and finding shelter. Our consciousness, for the longest time, according to modern science, has been concerned with this very limited cross section of what we’d now term as reality.

Now this mode of operation is not…

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6 thoughts on “Consciousness, Hallucinations and the evolution of human perception

  1. We come from dreams ~

    I had a running conversation with a great British skeptic a few years ago. She has to remain nameless, but she was pretty decent, not at all nasty like Mssrs. Randi and Dawkins. She once commented that people who claim to have out of body experiences were hallucinating. When I asked her if her contention was in itself an hallucination, she thought it was pretty funny – but said, “No.”

    Reply
    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      But you were correct, nevertheless. Her “no” is entirely subjective. I think you and I have had enough of those OBE’s to know something is quite real about them, or what takes place in them. If I assumed that my own NDE in which I received a “healing” from a devastating condition to make me as healthy as anyone can get, was a hallucination, I think that hallucinations should be strongly promoted. Do I care whether someone else has to believe it was a hallucination so their little materially circumscribed world can make sense? Do I not rather care that at 32 I was made healthier and stronger than I’d ever been in my entire life? Do I not rather care that that particular healing hallucination is still functioning now that I’m 70? Do I not rather care that the experience brought me face to face with a much more intelligent aspect of life than earth could ever demonstrate and that it took me from permanent depression, fear and anger, to joy and a driving desire to learn to be compassionate? That it showed me how fear of “death” is a controlling mechanism used by the Powers and the elites to keep us in slavery to their predatory ways?

      Reply
      1. We come from dreams ~

        I was flattered that she took the time to write to me. Eventually, I interviewed her and posted the result on the now-gone Outlands site and on our Tumblr. (Yes, we had one!) But – if this is a Monopoly game, we have the dice; and we simply do better in a world where you are healed and I get over my past – among many other positive benefits.

  2. polymath0

    Thank you so much for sharing this. I am just now learning more about the hallucinatory experience and its benefits in therapy. As my own experience with Ayahuasca had saved me from true depression (not the mild grief or melancholy some associate with the word, but the complete hopelessness that things could ever be good), I realized that its benefits were far greater than our medical ones. I forgot the subject completely for a while, until I met my husband’s long-time friend. Steve was a graduate of expression arts therapy, and he’s found that in his personal life the best therapy has been through mind altering experiences.

    Reply
    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      Noticed you say, “mind altering experiences” and not “mind altering substances.” I make a distinction between the two. The most common and accessible to all is the mind altering experience, of which OBE’s and NDE’s would be the most drastic. As a total non-drug user who has experienced one NDE and many(!) OBE’s, mostly after my NDE, I can vouch for the effectiveness of mind altering experiences when taken seriously, that is, when accepted as a gift meant to be used. I suppose one could then call them mind expanding experiences. From my experiences came a great freedom from Matrix programming; the ability to explore past lives and even future lives and events and use that information to change how I perceived myself in relation to the cosmos. Reality for me now is an infinite field of information and awareness, a “place” of joy, of clarity even in the middle of total chaos; a place of personal power through detachment and self empowerment from which I get to decide who and what “I am” moment by moment.

      Reply

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