Displaced Persons

What coming to, and living in, America can be like for immigrants. My parents chose Canada. There were some differences, but not many, not really. Perhaps much less patriotism, and that is always a good thing.

good marriage central*

File:1289 Podwórko. Ulica Miernicza. Foto Barbara Maliszewska.jpg
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Today is more personal — and tangential.

Below is a little piece I wrote 25 years ago, a few years after my arrival in the US. I was reminded of it yesterday while reading an article in the NYT Magazine, An American in a Strange Land, by Jim Yardley who came back to the U.S. after years of work-related absence and realized he did not recognize his country. The article is direct and piercing. Also, depressing. Its alternative title could have been “Inching Toward Dystopia.” Or maybe “lurching” instead of “inching” toward a new, Hunger Games-like reality, soon to come to a suburb near you.

Reading the (much worth reading) comments there, I came upon the “displaced person” term applied to Yardley. The term has much significance for me, for many reasons, some of them more clear than others.

Apart from that, and maybe even more…

View original post 1,511 more words

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6 thoughts on “Displaced Persons

  1. Lily Von Valley

    I liked reading your account from years ago, and also read the article. ..Both showed similarity of feeling although years apart. I thought how often one feels displaced in their country of origin, as well. I read this sometime back, but my phone somehow doesn’t allow me to comment. 🙂

    Reply
  2. Sha'Tara Post author

    Hi Lily, thanks for your comment. The good thing about being an immigrant and moving around a lot means you don’t take root. I have some mental awareness of the land of my birth (Brittany, France) but no attachment, and certainly none to Canada. Nations are racial and political designations we would all be much better off without. As I too observe the definite, irreversible downfall/collapse of the western empires from overuse of resources, political corruption and general moral decay, I can only be thankful I’m not a part of them, just an observer.

    Reply

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