There were Violets – a poem

 

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There were violets, I remember,
violets in the fields;
I remember well, violets.
They’re beautiful
I remember thinking.

It was easy, I was a child:
An innocent may walk
even past the gates of hell
and they cannot prevail.

The violets, I remember,
waved in unison
in a warm afternoon breeze,
smiling at me under the sun.

I wore a straw hat
mother made me wear.
Careful to keep it on, always
mother said,
I did not have to ask why.

I sat down among the violets.
They said something odd,
or so I thought
because I did not understand.

What does that mean,
mother,
we feed upon the flesh
of dead men?

 

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22 thoughts on “There were Violets – a poem

    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      Thank you, Josi. Never thought of myself as a poet before, but I suppose it’s all in the eye of the beholder and all that. The “poem” was deliberately written to touch nerves; to create a kind of shocking discomfort but without resorting to obscure language which often turns me off of reading poetry. Anyway, if you were looking for a more in-depth explanation of the last lines, I wrote an essay on it.

      Reply
      1. josipamarijanovic

        I’m gonna look for that essay. I really really like this one and I gotta say you are extremly humble. From the minute I read it, the first thought of it was “this person is so talented”, and you are. You are The poet.
        Keep on shining!

      2. Sha'Tara Post author

        I wouldn’t want to spoil the moment by saying something really stupid, so I’ll say this: thank you.

  1. Lisa R. Palmer

    “We feed upon the flesh of dead men…”

    Wow, Sha’Tara, just wow! Goosebumps and chills here. Hard to achieve when it’s 90+ degrees out and humid as hell. Well done!

    Reply
    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      Thanks for that, Lisa. Now you can turn down the air-conditioning! Here’s hoping that my explanation helps clarify those last two “enigmatic” lines.

      Reply
  2. Regis Auffray

    An intriguing poem.

    I did not expect that ending.

    It is a stark contrast to the beauty (and mystery) of violets.

    Thank you for sharing.

    Régis

    From: ~Burning Woman~ Sent: Friday, July 15, 2016 11:33 PM To: rauffray@shaw.ca Subject: [New post] There were Violets – a poem

    Sha’Tara posted: ” There were violets, I remember, violets in the fields; I remember well, violets. They’re beautiful I remember thinking. It was easy, I was a child: An innocent may walk even past the gates of hell and they cannot prevail. The violets, I rememb”

    Reply
    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      Thanks you, Regis. As a reply to your question (and similar hints) I wrote an explanation of the enigmatic last two lines. Hope the “essay” is an acceptable answer to your comment.

      Reply
  3. Rosaliene Bacchus

    Sha’Tara, I’m so glad that you’re experimenting with poetic verse. I agree with Regis that it’s an intriguing poem with an unexpected ending.

    In our innocence as children, we dare to walk where no adult dare tread and to see the beauty in all shades of life.

    Reply
    1. Sha'Tara Post author

      Thanks Rosaliene. I’m going to write a follow-up article dealing with the enigmatic last two lines. Now to work… !

      Reply
    2. Sha'Tara Post author

      As for children, yes, that’s true. Hence why “they” invented Kindergarten, to make sure these children never get a chance to experience freedom in “nature” even if it’s wandering around the city’s neighbourhoods. Got to make sure they never get a break from parent dependency to System dependency; never learn how to make decisions for themselves. They have to be programmed little clones who will do what they’re told and die for the elites when told to. Great world the globalists have invented.

      Reply

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